How Teeth Really Move: 
emerging trends in biology, biomechanics, genetics, pharmacology, and physiology


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012
8:30 - 9:00 AM DR. DOROTHY WHALEN &
DR. VINCENT G. KOKICH
  Introductory Comments

9:00 - 9:55 AM DR. ANNE MARIE KUIJPERS-JAGTMAN
  Forces & Rate of Tooth Movement: Part I
Orthodontic treatment is based on the biological principle that force application to a tooth causes a biological response in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, which results in tooth displacement. But the question of how to move teeth most efficiently has still not been answered. More attention should be given to basic science variables rather than only the technical ones. From this point of view the speaker will explore the biological relation between applied forces and rate of tooth movement before concluding with some clinical recommendations regarding force application.

10:00 - 10:55 AM DR. JAMES ZAHROWSKI
  Pharmacological Effects on Tooth Movement Pharmacology can be defined as chemicals, studied at the highest level of evidence, which can induce systemic physiological changes. After application of orthodontic forces, the desired tooth movement is dependent upon normal bone physiological functions. However, some medications have the ability to change bone physiology. Which medications can slow or stop orthodontic tooth movement? Can medications accelerate tooth movement? Know the medications, commonly taken by orthodontic patients, which can affect efficient tooth movement in your practice.

10:55 - 11:15 AM Refreshment Break

11:15 - 12:15 PM DRS. THOMAS & WILLIAM WILCKO
  Accelerated Tooth Movement Using Alveolar Decortications: What Really Happens? Part I
By stimulating and harnessing the innate potentials of living bone, teeth will move rapidly and great distances. When tooth movement is completed, bone around the roots of the teeth rebuilds itself with a greater alveolar volume over vital root surfaces. Our presenters will show how understanding and utilizing the dynamics of bone physiology and rethinking traditional concepts of tooth movement create an entirely new orthodontic paradigm.

12:15 - 1:15 PM Lunch

1:30 - 2:30 PM DR. JAMES HARTSFIELD
  What do Genes Have to do With Tooth Movement?
The concepts of genetics and heredity have long been recognized as being important in orthodontic treatment, but until recently the methods to study and apply these concepts have been largely miss-interpreted. Over ten years ago Human Genome Project was a significant first step in the subsequent advancements in genetic and genomic analysis that has resulted in the emerging area of Personalized Medicine. How the concept of Personalized Medicine may apply to orthodontics, and specifically to tooth movement and root resorption, will be discussed in two lectures.

2:30 - 3:25 PM DR. RODRIGO VIECILLI
  Optimizing Tooth Movement & Minimizing Root Resorption in Everyday Clinical Practice: How can Biomechanics Help You? Part I
In this lecture we will discuss the mechanics of mechanotransduction in orthodontics based on experimental results, and attempt to answer the following questions:
1) What is the macroscopic mechanotransduction, and how does it give us insight about possible molecular mechanisms?
2) Is orthodontic load an important factor for root resorption?
3) Does root resorption depend on the type of tooth movement?
4) Is there an optimum orthodontic load for tooth movement? What are the parameters involved to determine this load?
5) How can the clinical minimize external root resorption and maximize tooth movement efficiency in everyday practice based on contemporary biomechanics?

3:30-4:15 PM Panel Discussion & Questions

4:30-5:15 PM No-Host Cocktails
SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 2012
8:30 - 9:00 AM DR. DOROTHY WHALEN &
DR. VINCENT G. KOKICH
  Remarks

9:00 - 10:00 AM DR. JAMES HARTSFIELD
  Genetic Factors and Root Resorption, Is it All About Mechanics?
The concepts of genetics and heredity have long been recognized as being important in orthodontic treatment, but until recently the methods to study and apply these concepts have been largely miss-interpreted. Over ten years ago Human Genome Project was a significant first step in the subsequent advancements in genetic and genomic analysis that has resulted in the emerging area of Personalized Medicine. How the concept of Personalized Medicine may apply to orthodontics, and specifically to tooth movement and root resorption, will be discussed in two lectures.

10:00 - 10:20 AM Refreshment Break

10:20 - 11:00 AM DR. ANNE MARIE KUIJPERS-JAGTMAN
  Forces & Rate of Tooth Movement: Part II
Orthodontic treatment is based on the biological principle that force application to a tooth causes a biological response in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, which results in tooth displacement. But the question of how to move teeth most efficiently has still not been answered. More attention should be given to basic science variables rather than only the technical ones. From this point of view the speaker will explore the biological relation between applied forces and rate of tooth movement before concluding with some clinical recommendations regarding force application.

11:00 - 12:15 PM DRS. THOMAS & WILLIAM WILCKO
  Accelerated Tooth Movement Using Alveolar Decortications: What Really Happens? Part II
By stimulating and harnessing the innate potentials of living bone, teeth will move rapidly and great distances. When tooth movement is completed, bone around the roots of the teeth rebuilds itself with a greater alveolar volume over vital root surfaces. Our presenters will show how understanding and utilizing the dynamics of bone physiology and rethinking traditional concepts of tooth movement create an entirely new orthodontic paradigm.

12:15 - 1:30 PM Lunch

1:30 - 2:45 PM DR. BIRTE MELSEN
  How Has the Spectrum of Orthodontics Changed Over the Past Decades?
Three aspects have a significant impact on orthodontics, the distribution of patients, the focus on “fast food orthodontics”, working brackets and intelligent wires and finally the skeletal anchorage. The lecture will attempt to summarize the bearing of these three factors on present orthodontics.

2:45 - 3:30 PM DR. RODRIGO VIECILLI
  Optimizing Tooth Movement & Minimizing Root Resorption in Everyday Clinical Practice: How can Biomechanics Help You? Part II
In this lecture we will discuss the mechanics of mechanotransduction in orthodontics based on experimental results, and attempt to answer the following questions:
1) What is the macroscopic mechanotransductiion, and how does it give us insight about possible molecular mechanisms?
2) Is orthodontic load an important factor for root resorption?
3) Does root resorption depend on the type of tooth movement?
4) Is there an optimum orthodontic load for tooth movement? What are the parameters involved to determine this load?
5) How can the clinical minimize external root resorption and maximize tooth movement efficiency in everyday practice based on contemporary biomechanics?

3:30 - 4:15 PM Panel Discussion & Questions

4:15 - 4:30 PM DR. VINCENT G. KOKICH
Seminar Overview
What have we learned?